Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992) View larger

Marlene Dietrich: From Berlin to Hollywood ~ NOV 20, 2021, 7PM

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Marlene Dietrich: From Berlin to Hollywood. Presented by Bruce Thompson, Ph.D., Saturday, November 20, 2021, 7PM, in person and via simultaneous live video stream with interactive Q&A.  Tickets: $35 (FOR ONLINE, ONLY ONE TICKET PER HOUSEHOLD IS NECESSARY. PHONE RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR VERY LIMITED IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE AT $35 EACH -- 408-864-4060, M-F, 10AM-4PM)

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Marlene Dietrich: From Berlin to HollywoodFor over three decades, from the early 1930s through the 1960s, Marlene Dietrich was one of Hollywood's greatest stars—not only an actress who appeared in classic films during the golden age of the studio system, but also a seemingly ageless icon of beauty and glamour, capable of drawing legions of adoring fans to her concerts even after she ceased to accept roles in movies.  But her roots as a performer lay far from Hollywoodin the raucous world of Weimar Berlin, the capital of European entertainment during the 1920s.  This lecture will examine the origins of her star persona—her distinctive combination of erotic magnetism and worldly cynicism—in the Weimar era, her collaboration with the great director Josef von Sternberg, starting with her career-making performance in The Blue Angel (1930) and continuing with six classic films made at Paramount during the early 1930s, her many love affairs, her heroic conduct during the Second World War, and her extraordinary run as a cabaret performer (in collaboration with her musical director, Bert Bacharach), during the 1960s.

Presented by Bruce Thompson, Ph.D., Saturday, November 20, 2021, 7PM, in person and via simultaneous live video stream with interactive Q&A.  Tickets: $35 (FOR ONLINE, ONLY ONE TICKET PER HOUSEHOLD IS NECESSARY. PHONE RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR VERY LIMITED IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE AT $35 EACH -- 408-864-4060, M-F, 10AM-4PM)

Bruce Thompson is a lecturer in the Departments of History and Literature and the Associate Director of Jewish Studies at U.C.-Santa Cruz, and also teaches at the Institute. He received his Ph.D. in History from Stanford; his areas of scholarly research include European intellectual and cultural history, French history, British Isles history, American Jewish intellectual and cultural history, the history of cinema, and the history of espionage.